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Trade Compliance

US CBP (U.S. Customs and Border Protection)

Largest federal law enforcement agency of the United States Department of Homeland Security that is charged with regulating and facilitating international trade, collecting import duties, and enforcing U.S. regulations, including trade, customs, and immigration. CBP is the largest law enforcement agency in the United States.

www.cbp.gov

 

IATA (The International Air Transport Association)

Trade association of the world’s airlines. Consisting of 274 airlines, primarily major carriers, representing 117 countries, the IATA's member airlines account for carrying approximately 83% of total Available Seat Kilometers air traffic. IATA supports airline activity and helps formulate industry policy and standards.

www.iata.org

 

ICC (International Chamber of Commerce)

ICC is the world business organization, helping businesses of all sizes and in all countries to operate both internationally and responsibly. ICC has three main activities: rule setting, dispute resolution, and policy advocacy. Because its member companies and associations are themselves engaged in international business, ICC has unrivalled authority in making rules that govern the conduct of business across borders.

iccwbo.org

 

FMC (Federal Maritime Commission)

The Federal Maritime Commission is responsible for regulating the U.S. international ocean transportation system for the benefit of U.S. exporters, importers, and the U.S. consumer.

www.fmc.gov/

 

BIMCO (Baltic and International Maritime Council)

The largest of the international shipping associations representing shipowners; its membership controls around 65 percent of the world’s tonnage and it has members in more than 120 countries, including managers, brokers and agents. The association’s main objective is to protect its global membership through the provision of information and advice, and while promoting fair business practices, facilitate harmonisation and standardization of commercial shipping practices and contracts

www.bimco.org

 

GAFTA (Grain and Feed Trade Association)

An international trade association consisting of traders, brokers, superintendents, analysts, fumigators, arbitrators and other professionals in the international grain trade. GAFTA sets out to promote international trade and protect the interests of its members.

www.gafta.com

 

FOSFA (Federation of Oils, Seeds and Fats Associations)

A professional international contract issuing and arbitral body concerned exclusively with the world trade in oilseeds, oils and fats with 1,128 members in 90 countries. These members include producers and processors, shippers and dealers, traders, brokers and agents, superintendents, analysts, shipowners, ship brokers, tank storage companies, arbitrators, consultants, lawyers, insurers and others, providing services to traders.

www.fosfa.org

 

USDA (United States Department of Agriculture)

The U.S. federal executive department responsible for developing and executing federal laws related to farming, agriculture, forestry, and food. It aims to meet the needs of farmers and ranchers, promote agricultural trade and production, work to assure food safety, protect natural resources, foster rural communities and end hunger in the United States and internationally.

www.usda.gov

 

FDA (Food and Drug Administration)

A federal agency of the United States Department of Health and Human Services, one of the United States federal executive departments. The FDA is responsible for protecting and promoting public health through the control and supervision of food safety, tobacco products, dietary supplements, prescription and over-the-counter pharmaceutical drugs (medications), vaccines, biopharmaceuticals, blood transfusions, medical devices, electromagnetic radiation emitting devices (ERED), cosmetics, animal foods & feed and veterinary products.

www.fda.gov

 

FR (Federal Register)

The official journal of the federal government of the United States that contains government agency rules, proposed rules, and public notices. It is published daily, except on federal holidays. The final rules promulgated by a federal agency and published in the Federal Register are ultimately reorganized by topic or subject matter and codified in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), which is updated annually.

www.federalregister.gov

 

WTO (World Trade Organization)

An intergovernmental organization that regulates international trade. The WTO deals with regulation of trade between participating countries by providing a framework for negotiating trade agreements and a dispute resolution process aimed at enforcing participants' adherence to WTO agreements, which are signed by representatives of member governments and ratified by their parliaments. Most of the issues that the WTO focuses on derive from previous trade negotiations, especially from the Uruguay Round (1986–1994).

www.wto.org

 

DOT (Department of Transportation)

A federal Cabinet department of the U.S. government concerned with transportation. It was established by an act of Congress on October 15, 1966, and began operation on April 1, 1967. It is governed by the United States Secretary of Transportation.

www.transportation.gov

 

DOC (Department of Commerce)

The Cabinet department of the United States government concerned with promoting economic growth. Among its tasks are gathering economic and demographic data for business and government decision-making, and helping to set industrial standards. This organization's main purpose is to create jobs, promote economic growth, encourage sustainable development and improve standards of living for all Americans.

www.commerce.gov

 

US ITC (US International Trade Commission)

The United States International Trade Commission (USITC) is an independent, quasijudicial Federal agency with broad investigative responsibilities on matters of trade. The agency investigates the effects of dumped and subsidized imports on domestic industries and conducts global safeguard investigations. The Commission also adjudicates cases involving imports that allegedly infringe intellectual property rights. Through such proceedings, the agency facilitates a rules-based international trading system. The Commission also serves as a Federal resource where trade data and other trade policy-related information are gathered and analyzed. The information and analysis are provided to the President, the Office of the United States Trade Representative (USTR), and Congress to facilitate the development of sound and informed U.S. trade policy. The Commission makes most of its information and analysis available to the public to promote understanding of international trade issues. The mission of the Commission is to (1) administer U.S. trade remedy laws within its mandate in a fair and objective manner; (2) provide the President, USTR, and Congress with independent analysis, information, and support on matters of tariffs, international trade, and U.S. competitiveness; and (3) maintain the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTS).

www.usitc.gov/

 

ISO (International Organization for Standardization)

An independent, non-governmental organization, the members of which are the standards organizations of the 163 member countries. It is the world's largest developer of voluntary international standards and facilitates world trade by providing common standards between nations. Its international standard-setting body is composed of representatives from various national standards organizations. The organization promotes worldwide proprietary, industrial and commercial standards.

www.iso.org

 

BIS (Bureau of Industry and Security)

BIS Mission: Advance U.S. national security, foreign policy, and economic objectives by ensuring an effective export control and treaty compliance system and promoting continued U.S. strategic technology leadership. The Bureau's mission is to protect the security of the United States, which includes its national security, economic security, cyber security, and homeland security.

www.bis.doc.gov/

 

EAR (Export Administration Regulations)

EAR regulates export of “dual-use” items. These items include goods and related technology, including technical data and technical assistance, which are designed for commercial purposes, but which could have military applications, such as computers, aircraft, and pathogens.

www.bis.doc.gov/index.php/regulations/export-administration-regulations-ear

 

ASTM (American Society for Testing and Materials)

ASTM International is a globally recognized leader in the development and delivery of voluntary consensus standards. Today, over 12,000 ASTM standards are used around the world to improve product quality, enhance health and safety, strengthen market access and trade, and build consumer confidence.

www.astm.org/Standard/standards-and-publications.html

 

BS (British Standards)

BSI is a non-profit distributing organization and offers global services in the linked fields of standardization, systems assessment, product certification, training and advisory services.

www.bsigroup.com/en-GB/standards/

 

RoHS (Restriction of Hazardous Substances)

RoHS stands for Restriction of Hazardous Substances, and impacts the entire electronics industry and many electrical products as well. The original RoHS, also known as Directive 2002/95/EC, originated in the European Union in 2002 and restricts the use of six hazardous materials found in electrical and electronic products. All applicable products in the EU market since July 1, 2006 must pass RoHS compliance.

www.rohsguide.com

 

UCC (Uniform Commercial Code)

The Uniform Commercial Code (UCC), first published in 1952, is one of a number of uniform acts that have been put into law with the goal of harmonizing the law of sales and other commercial transactions across the United States of America (U.S.) through UCC adoption by all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and the U.S. territories.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uniform_Commercial_Code#UCC_Articles

 

UCP 600 (Uniform Customs and Practice)

The Uniform Customs and Practice for Documentary Credits (UCP) is a set of rules on the issuance and use of letters of credit. The UCP is utilized by bankers and commercial parties in more than 175 countries in trade finance.

store.iccwbo.org/icc-uniform-customs-and-practice-for-documentary-credits

 

CE (Comformite Europeene)

CE Marking is the symbol as shown on the top of this page. The letters "CE" are the abbreviation of French phrase "Conformité Européene" which literally means "European Conformity". The term initially used was "EC Mark" and it was officially replaced by "CE Marking" in the Directive 93/68/EEC in 1993.

ec.europa.eu/growth/single-market/ce-marking_en

 

CCC (China Compulsary Certification)

China Compulsory Certification (CCC) is similar to other certifications for product quality standardization–such as the European CE system–but there are important differences. The CCC  certificate was introduced in 2002 and applies to imported goods as well as to Chinese products. Products which require certification may only be imported, sold and/or used in business activities in China, after a China Compulsory Certification has been obtained.

www.china-certification.com/en/

 

UN Hazmat (United Nations hazardous materials)

UN numbers (United Nations numbers) are four-digit numbers that identify hazardous materials, and articles (such as explosives, Flammable Liquids to oxidizing solid or toxic liquids, etc.) in the framework of international transport.

www.hazmattool.com/info.php

 

GHS (Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling)

An internationally agreed-upon system, created by the United Nations beginning in 1992 and as of 2017 is not yet fully implemented in many countries. It was designed to replace the various classification and labelling standards used in different countries by using consistent criteria on a global level. It supersedes the relevant system of the European Union, which has implemented the United Nations' GHS into EU law as the CLP Regulation and United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration standards.

www.unece.org/trans/danger/publi/ghs/ghs_rev06/06files_e.html

 

CMR (Convention on the Contract for the International Carriage of Goods by Road)

Standardized document for cross-border transport of cargo by road, based on UN recommendations for uniform international rules and in force in the European Union.

www.iru.org

 

IMDG (International Maritime Dangerous Goods)

IMDG Code or International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code is accepted as an international guideline to the safe transportation or shipment of dangerous goods or hazardous materials by water on vessel.

www.imo.org/en/Publications/IMDGCode/Pages/Default.aspx

 

IncoTerms (International commercial terms)

The Incoterms rules or International Commercial Terms are a series of pre-defined commercial terms published by the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) relating to international commercial law. They are widely used in International commercial transactions or procurement processes as the use in international sales is encouraged by trade councils, courts and international lawyers. A series of three-letter trade terms related to common contractual sales practices, the Incoterms rules are intended primarily to clearly communicate the tasks, costs, and risks associated with the transportation and delivery of goods. Incoterms inform sales contract defining respective obligations, costs, and risks involved in the delivery of goods from the seller to the buyer. However, it does not constitute contract or govern law. Also it does not define where titles transfer and does not address the price payable, currency or credit items. The Incoterms rules are accepted by governments, legal authorities, and practitioners worldwide for the interpretation of most commonly used terms in international trade. They are intended to reduce or remove altogether uncertainties arising from different interpretation of the rules in different countries. As such they are regularly incorporated into sales contracts worldwide. The first work published by the ICC on international trade terms was issued in 1923, with the first edition known as Incoterms published in 1936. the Incoterms rules were amended in 1953, 1967, 1976, 1980, 1990, and 2000, with the eighth version— Incoterms 2010 —having been published on January 1, 2011. The ICC have begun consultations on a new revision of Incoterms, to be called Incoterms 2020. "Incoterms" is a registered trademark of the ICC.

iccwbo.org/resources-for-business/incoterms-rules/incoterms-rules-2010/

 

REACH (Registration, Evaluation and Authorisation of Chemicals)

Aims to improve the protection of human health and the environment through the better and earlier identification of the intrinsic properties of chemical substances. This is done by the four processes of REACH, namely the registration, evaluation, authorisation and restriction of chemicals. REACH also aims to enhance innovation and competitiveness of the EU chemicals industry.

echa.europa.eu

 

ADR (European Agreement concerning the International Carriage of Dangerous Goods by Road)

A 1957 United Nations treaty that governs transnational transport of hazardous materials

www.unece.org/trans/danger/publi/adr/adr_e.html